Probiotics

Excerpt From:

Low Histamine Diet 101: What to Eat, What to Avoid, and Why

by Amy Richter, MS, RDN, LD, CLT

Histamine Degrading Probiotics

Optimizing gut bacteria is vital for overall health and disease prevention (37, 38). Unfortunately, that’s not easy to do for those with histamine intolerance because probiotic foods (yogurt, kefir, kombucha, etc.) are high in histamine and should be avoided.

Another option is to use probiotic supplements, but it’s important to choose probiotic supplements containing bacteria that do not produce histamine.

The following strains may be helpful because they have been found to break down or reduce the formation of histamine:

  • Lactobacillus plantarum (39)
  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus (40, 41)
  • Bifidobacterium infantis (42)
  • Bifidobacterium lactis (43)
  • Bifidobacterium longum (42)
  • Lactobacillus brevis (44)
  • Lactobacillus casei (45, 46)
  • Lactobacillus delbrueckii (45)
  • Lactobacillus fermentum (47)
  • Lactobacillus helveticus (47)
  • Lactobacillus hilgardii (44)
  • Lactobacillus lactis (47)
  • Enterococcus faecium (47)
  • Streptococcus thermophilus (48, 49)

These Following Strains Should Be Avoided Because They Produce Histamine In The GI Tract

  • Lactobacillus brevis (44)
  • Lactobacillus casei (45, 46)
  • Lactobacillus delbrueckii (45)
  • Lactobacillus fermentum (47)
  • Lactobacillus helveticus (47)
  • Lactobacillus hilgardii (44)
  • Lactobacillus lactis (47)
  • Enterococcus faecium (47)
  • Streptococcus thermophilus (48, 49)

These lists are not comprehensive, because this is still a new area of research, but they can be used to guide decisions about which probiotic supplements to purchase. {Looking for the best probiotic for histamine intolerance? Join The Functional Nutrition Library to learn about our favorite one.}

My Choice and Why

After reading the above article, I began a search for an probiotic that didn’t have any of the strains that produce histamines.

It was impossible to find a probiotic that didn’t contain any of the bad strains. The best that I could find is the PB8 brand pictured to the right. It had only one bad strain, bacillus casei, which I highlighted above.

After some research I discovered that there are probiotics created without any of the strains but they were 3x as expensive and so I opted for PB8.

After using PB8 for several months I didn’t notice an reaction or “pile up” effect so I continued them until I found a better supplement that used what I now call a “New Science” approach to Gut Health.